Apptorney: Increasing access to justice and promoting the rule of law in Zambia
KEY INDIVIDUAL(s)

Muchu Kaingu

WHO CAN BENEFIT FROM
THIS CASE STUDY

Policy/decision-makers

Communities

Civic Tech

KEY CATEGORIES

Human trafficking

Modern slavery

Safety

CONTACT CTIN

CASE STUDY

Apptorney: Increasing access to justice and promoting the rule of law in Zambia

TYPE OF ORGANISATION RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INITIATIVE

NAME

EMAIL

WEBSITE

Apptorney

info@apptorney.org

STATUS

COUNTRY

FOUNDING DATE

Live

Zambia

2018

N/A

BRIEF OVERVIEW OF CASE STUDY

Apptorney is a legal tech platform that provides users with legal information on Zambian case law, legislation, and subsidiary legislation. Apptorney is a legal tech start-up headquartered in Lusaka, Zambia by founders at the intersection technology and law. The platform is an agnostic mobile application that uses natural language processing and content indexing and categorization to provide user friendly search functionality to its users.

WHAT WAS THE PROBLEM AND APPROACH?

The Problem

Millions of Zambians are legally disadvantaged because they do not know the law as it is inaccessible to them. In order to access the law, they have to contact a lawyer, or dig deep into physical court archives, expensive publications, and complicated systems that only legal practitioners can understand. The status quo ensures that a select elite have access to justice while the masses are denied it. The law is currently a privilege of the rich and this undermines the rule of law.

The Solution

Apptorney is a platform developed to bring the law to the people. It consolidates all sources of law into one platform accessible by all. Apptorney aims to provide free, public, and user-friendly access to the law to make it available to Zambian citizens, legal institutions, and businesses. 

Apptorney users can have access to:

  • Zambian Case Law
  • Zambian Legislation
  • Zambian Subsidiary Legislations
LESSONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

What played out and why? (story, enablers / obstacles, successes / challenges, assessment…)

Apptorney, was founded in 2018 by Muchu Kaingu, Edwin Kamau, Soi Kaingu and Misozi Ngulube at the intersection of technology and law. The founders advocate for legal inclusion through various channels that emphasize inclusive technology. Apptorney is the first mobile application to provide access to Zambian law. The platform is updated by a dedicated team of legal researchers. The Apptorney platform is composed of a right mix of technologists (50%) and legal (50%) whose skills ultimately come together to bring legal information to the Zambian citizens. 

Successes

  • Apptorney was named the winner of Seedstars Lusaka pitching event in 2019. 

Apptorney’s planned goals and Milestones

  • Partnerships with the governments, as well as partnerships with mobile network operators.
  • Provision of free legal access to Zambians.
  • Addition of a marketplace that will democratize legal services and make legal access more affordable for all Zambians.
  • Addition of legal directory where law firms can promote their services.

What is your takeaway message? 

Using Apptorney can save you close to 80% of legal research time.

RELATED LINKS & DOWNLOADS

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

AskYourGov: A web portal where citizens can request information from government agencies
KEY INDIVIDUAL(s)

Katie Modrau

WHO CAN BENEFIT FROM
THIS CASE STUDY

Governments

Policymakers

Women and Children

NGOs

KEY CATEGORIES

Human trafficking

Modern slavery

Safety

CONTACT CTIN

CASE STUDY

AskYourGov: A web portal where citizens can request information from government agencies

TYPE OF ORGANISATION RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INITIATIVE

NAME

EMAIL

WEBSITE

AskYourGov

team@askyourgov.ug

STATUS

COUNTRY

FOUNDING DATE

Live

Uganda

2014

N/A

BRIEF OVERVIEW OF CASE STUDY

Askyourgov is a web portal where citizens can make information requests to information officers from the different ministries, departments, and agencies. The main objective of this platform is to bridge the gap between government and citizens and facilitate the public to ask for information. At the same time, Askyourgov, incorporates ICT in the work of government.

WHAT WAS THE PROBLEM AND APPROACH?

The problem

There were barriers to the citizens’ right to information. Ugandan citizens struggled to access public information. 

The Solution 

Askyourgov is a web portal that provides Ugandans with the right to publicly request information. The portal serves as a library of information requested by citizens and provided by government agencies. Citizens are able to search through the library. 

The Askyourgov platform is aimed at facilitating the implementation of the 2005 Access to Information Act. It promotes transparency and accountability of the state to citizens through making information open and available to all citizens including civil society organisations, media, human rights defenders, and many other stakeholders.

How it works

  • Citizens file a request with a public body via this link askyourgov.ug and the request is sent as an email to the respective public body. 
  • The Information officer at the public body replies to the email.
  • The reply is delivered to the requester via email and at the same time published on askyourgov.ug

      Benefits of the portal

  • A more accessible, transparent and effective Government.
  • Saves money, time, and public officers work of answering repeated requests.
  • Provides statistics about submitted and answered requests.
  • Incorporates the use of ICT and its benefits in the work of Government MDAs.
LESSONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

What played out and why? (story, enablers / obstacles, successes / challenges, assessment…)

According to partners of Askyourgov, CIPESA – the Government of Uganda is committed to constitutional governance and citizen participation and has since 2005 been implementing article 41 of the constitution regarding the right to information. Following the adoption of the Access to Information Act, 2005 (ATIA), Government issued Access to Information Regulations 2011 No.17 and has been creating awareness of information officers and the public. In 2013 Government adopted a Communication’s Policy to further strengthen citizens’ right to information. 

The Government of Uganda collaborated with Africa Freedom of Information Centre and Coalition on Freedom of Information to implement an initiative that will facilitate citizens access to information through use of the internet. 

On the launch of the platform, the then Minister of Information and National Guidance acknowledged that “the tool avails to Ugandans an opportunity to access public information. We as the government can also use the platform when planning by identifying the types of information that citizens most request.” She also added that the platform will increase public scrutiny of the Ugandan government and enhance transparency and accountability to citizens.

RELATED LINKS & DOWNLOADS

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

Flare: Providing emergency response for citizens
KEY INDIVIDUAL(s)

Maria Rabinovich

WHO CAN BENEFIT FROM
THIS CASE STUDY

Policy/decision-makers

Communities

Civic Tech

KEY CATEGORIES

Health

Mobile

Open Data

Technology

CONTACT CTIN

CASE STUDY

Flare: Better, Faster Emergency Response

TYPE OF ORGANISATION RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INITIATIVE

NAME

EMAIL

WEBSITE

STATUS

COUNTRY

FOUNDING DATE

Live

Kenya

2016

N/A

BRIEF OVERVIEW OF CASE STUDY

Flare is an app that aggregates public and privately owned ambulance companies into an interface for patients and hospitals. It is a digitalized 911 system for the African context. With the Flare platform, ambulance companies use the browser dashboard to manage their fleet and the app in their vehicles to respond to patient and hospital requests. Healthcare professionals and patients also use the app or hotline to coordinate patient transfers and rescues.

WHAT WAS THE PROBLEM AND APPROACH?

The Problem

Today in Nairobi, as is the case throughout the many cities in Africa, mostly rely on private transport or taxis instead of an ambulance in an emergency because there is no single line or system to coordinate emergency response. At the same time, there are plenty of ambulances waiting idly. 

 

The Solution

Flare is an Uber-style online platform that aims to connect people to the closest emergency responders. Public and private ambulance crews log into the system at the start of a shift. Their location can be tracked and monitored by any hospital registered to Flare. The platform promises access to a 24/7 hotline of emergency professionals.

 

Flare aggregates all the available ambulances on a map for emergency co-ordinators to choose the most appropriate vehicle based on where it is. The platform also incorporates Google maps traffic data to help emergency workers navigate Nairobi’s notorious traffic jams.

Hospitals pay a subscription fee to access the service whilst individuals can sign up for membership, with levels of cover starting from around $15 a year. 

LESSONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

What played out and why? (story, enablers / obstacles, successes / challenges, assessment…)

Flare was born from the recognised need of private and public providers to better serve their constituencies, particularly in areas underserved by public emergency services.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Flare technology played a critical referral role by transferring patients to the right point of care. Patients are moved in ambulances to limit further COVID-19 exposure. Flare also mapped available resources at hospitals, including intensive care units (ICUs) and high dependency units (HDUs).

What are some of the lessons? 

“The response time that we have seen has gone down from 162 minutes, which is the average, to about 15 to 20 minutes,” says Co-Founder and CEO Caitlin Dolkart. 

RELATED LINKS & DOWNLOADS

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

Mulika: Promoting and facilitating citizen participation in national security and service delivery in Kenya
KEY INDIVIDUAL(s)

Grace Wanjohi

WHO CAN BENEFIT FROM
THIS CASE STUDY

Policy/decision-makers

Communities

Civic Tech

KEY CATEGORIES

Government

Technology

Accountability

Mobile

Pubic Services

Transparency

CONTACT CTIN

CASE STUDY

Mulika: a platform that promotes and facilitates citizen participation in national security and service delivery in Kenya

TYPE OF ORGANISATION RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INITIATIVE

NAME

EMAIL

WEBSITE

STATUS

COUNTRY

FOUNDING DATE

Live

Kenya

2015

BRIEF OVERVIEW OF CASE STUDY

Mulika is a swahili word that means to shine a light on or to highlight. The Mulika Kenya platform is an Integrated Information Delivery System configured to act as a virtual report desk; enabling mobile phone users to report incidents of conflict, insecurity, and poor service delivery anonymously without fear of reprisals since the receivers (security/governement agents) get a text branded “MULIKA” and therefore do not have the details of the sender. The Platform makes use of the SMS Code 22068, the MULIKA app, and online portal where citizens send information on crimes and service delivery. The report is replicated immediately to the county and sub county security intelligence committees and other relevant government agencies.

WHAT WAS THE PROBLEM AND APPROACH?

The Problem

In recent times, Kenya has experienced high levels of insecurity and bloody conflicts. This hinders the country’s potential for economic growth and diverts resources from development projects to security enforcement. The public is expected to share information on insecurity. However, this information has not been forthcoming because of accusations of corruption levelled against the police coupled with a public perception that the police do not act on cases that are reported to them. 

The Solution 

Mulika platform seeks to promote and facilitate citizen participation in security. It enables anonymous crime reporting and monitoring by any member of the public. The system works on any type of handset available in Kenya. As the platform enables the public to report anonymously, the fear of victimization is eliminated since those receiving the information are unable to access the details of the sender. This system also allows citizens to report police misconduct without fear.

The platforms process supports coordination, decision making, and police deployment at the national, county and community level in addressing reported crime. There is usually no vacuum in security management in Kenya. The multi agencies operate within a coordinated protocol headed by the chairs of the county and sub county committees and they recognize internal hierarchy. Once a Mulika alert has been reported, it is handled by relevant teams within the committees. Each agency plays a role without conflict or duplication. 

The platform services can be accessed in two ways:

Option 1: Reporting via SMS 

  1. Create a text, beginning with your county name (very important). 
  2. Proceed to give the information about the crime. 
  3. Send the text to 988. 
  4. Sending the text is free of charge. 
  5. Your number will be concealed when the texts are forwarded to the authorities.

 Option 2: Via Mulika App

LESSONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

What played out and why? (story, enablers / obstacles, successes / challenges, assessment…)

The initiative was founded by Grace Wanjohi, according to Wanjohi, the whole idea behind the initiative was to enable Kenyans to report cases anonymously. “Now Kenyans from every corner of the country can feel free to report cases of crime by sending a short message”  

This initiative was initially tested and piloted in Nakuru and Nandi Counties and thereafter rolled out to the rest of the counties. The platform is disseminated through, public barazas, local media stations and social media. As a security installation holding sensitive data, the Platform is hosted at the Regional Coordinators office (Rift Valley Region) and linked to senior security officers in all 47 counties.

According to security chiefs, in the operating counties this initiative has been able to actualise community policing popularly referred to as Nyumba Kumi. 

 

What are some of the lessons?

Wanjohi, said the platform has led to a considerable decrease of crimes in urban areas as police are able to act promptly when a crime is reported. 

RELATED LINKS & DOWNLOADS

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

Tuta-me: Accessible, Reliable Edu-Tech Solutions
KEY INDIVIDUAL(s)

Abed Tau

WHO CAN BENEFIT FROM
THIS CASE STUDY

Policy/decision-makers

Practitioners

Communities

Civic Tech activists

KEY CATEGORIES

Access to information

Education

Mobile

Youth

CONTACT CTIN

CASE STUDY

Tuta-me: Accessible, Reliable Edu-Tech Solutions

TYPE OF ORGANISATION RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INITIATIVE

NAME

EMAIL

WEBSITE

STATUS

COUNTRY

FOUNDING DATE

Live

South Africa

2016

N/A

BRIEF OVERVIEW OF CASE STUDY

Tuta-Me is an online learning programme for Grade 8 – 12 learners studying Maths, Physical Science and English. Tuta-Me developed an online platform that aims to promote independent learning and deeper understanding. The platform gives learners access to CAPS aligned content, notes, past papers, videos, textbooks, and an online tutor. This is done through bursary programme support and online learning platform, Mobi-Tuta.

WHAT WAS THE PROBLEM AND APPROACH?

The Problem

Students often have the challenge in accessing additional assistance with their schoolwork, such as access to tutors, notes, past paper, and textbooks etc. 

The Solution 

Established in 2016, Tuta-Me initially specialised in connecting learners who need academic assistance with highly qualified tutors. However, since then the platform has grown to serve a greater need than just being the “Uber” of tutoring.  

The Tutor-Me platform allows the learner to book a qualified tutor based on their academic needs. The learner and the tutor are then able to arrange a session, in-person or online, at the time and place suitable to both. Tuta-Me, then ensures that the tutor conducts the session professionally and to the benefit of the learner. 

“Tutors set their own rates, availability and the areas that they can tutor in. “Students are then able to find a tutor based on their needs in terms of subject, area and time. A student can then rate a tutor, which ensures that quality is maintained,” said Hyslop. 

LESSONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

What played out and why? (story, enablers / obstacles, successes / challenges, assessment…)

Abel Tau Co-Founder of Tuta-me had returned from his visit to Silicon Valley in San Francisco when he was inspired to start an Uber of “something” in South Africa. After brainstorming, Tau and Hyslop decided to focus on introducing technology into the way that tutoring services were delivered. From there, Tuta-Me was born. Dylan Hyslop, said Tuta-Me started with two people, but had grown to seven people. 

The app was developed at the beginning of 2015 and taken to market by co-founders Abed and Dylan in March 2016.

Successes

The startup became known in 2016 when it came second at the Hack Jozi Challenge, and soon raised an angel funding to quicken the solutions development.  

What were the lessons learned? 

After 18 months of its launch, Tuta-me had to pivot, in 2018 they had to switch their business model to a B2B model to focus on fewer clients with bigger impact. Now, it offers online learning programmes to Grade 8-12 learners in subjects such as Maths, Physical Science and English, and allows corporate entities to sponsor tutoring sessions for bursary students. Hyslop told Disrupt Africa the pivot was primarily for economic reasons, with the Tuta-Me team having overestimated the B2C buying power in South Africa. 

“The goal is to keep building our technology and learning platform, growing in content and partners which help spread the availability of the platform. Our ultimate goal is to get out learning platform to all school users in the country for free,” said Hyslop. 

RELATED LINKS & DOWNLOADS

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

Veza: Empowering the public to hold South African Police accountable
KEY INDIVIDUAL(s)

Kavisha Pillay

WHO CAN BENEFIT FROM
THIS CASE STUDY

Policy/decision-makers

Communities

Civic Tech

KEY CATEGORIES

Transparency

Accountability

Access to information

Open Data

CONTACT CTIN

CASE STUDY

Veza: Empowering the public to hold South African Police accountable

TYPE OF ORGANISATION RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INITIATIVE

NAME

EMAIL

WEBSITE

Veza

info@corruptionwatch.org.za

STATUS

COUNTRY

FOUNDING DATE

Live

South Africa

2021

N/A

BRIEF OVERVIEW OF CASE STUDY

The Veza (a colloquial term for ‘reveal’ or ‘expose’) online tool is an open data platform developed by Corruption Watch with the goal of improving transparency and accountability in the South African Police Service (SAPS). Veza is designed to encourage public participation in the matter of transparency in policing, while also providing access to key information about police operations. Its use will help to strengthen the role of the public and civil society in calling for change in the SAPS, and in reducing the power imbalance that exists between the SAPS and members of the public.

WHAT WAS THE PROBLEM AND APPROACH?

The Problem

There is an overwhelming number of complaints from whistle-blowers about police corruption from various communities experiencing police violence and abuse. Often these cases go unreported and thereby police transparency is obscured thereby not held accountable for their wrongdoings. 

 

The Solution

Veza is an interactive open data tool, a first of its kind in South Africa that improves transparency in policing in the country and places the power to hold the South African Police Services (SAPS) accountable in the of the public. 

The Veza tool provides information at national, provincial and district level. It features interactive maps of police corruption trends and hotspots, information relating to the public’s rights when encountering the police in various situations, and data on all 1 150 police stations across the country, such as locations, resources, budget, and personnel. It also enables users to rate and review police stations based on personal experiences, to compare resources of up to four stations, to commend honest and ethical police officers, and to report incidents of corruption and police misconduct that are immediately geo-located through the tool.

The data used to populate the Veza tool was obtained directly from the SAPS through the submission of a number of applications under the Promotion of Access to Information Act. The collection and verification of data is an ongoing process, and the team is continually working to address the current gaps in information from specific provinces, districts and individual police stations by applying pressure to the necessary bodies to disclose the relevant information, which is in the public interest.

LESSONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

What played out and why? (story, enablers / obstacles, successes / challenges, assessment…)

This technological offering was made possible by Community Watch’s (CW) selection at the end of 2018 as one of four winners of the Google Impact Challenge, which aimed to encourage local innovators to solve a social problem using technology. The support from this grant and other donors enabled the CW team to develop an idea to address the specific problem of police misconduct and abuse of power. 

“Since Corruption Watch’s inception in 2012, innovation has always been central to our approach in addressing systemic and pervasive corruption in South Africa,” says Kavisha Pillay, head of stakeholder relations and campaigns at Corruption Watch. “The launch of the Veza tool signifies a new era for Corruption Watch as we explore how transparency, big data and accessible technology can be used to combat corruption and advance broader social justice issues.”

What are some of the recommendations? 

The Veza tool is also an opportunity for the SAPS and other government structures to embrace the concept of open data and public access to information – this will go a long way to restoring public confidence in the vital role that they play in the country. Members of the police service can themselves benefit from the use of the geo-location feature that highlights hotspots of corruption and gain valuable insight into the allocation and use of resources of their own police stations.

RELATED LINKS & DOWNLOADS

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

Dataphyte: Deploying data tools and technology for socio-economic development in Nigeria
KEY INDIVIDUAL(s)

Joshua Olufemi

WHO CAN BENEFIT FROM
THIS CASE STUDY

Access to information

Accountability

Government

Open Data

Transparency

KEY CATEGORIES

Policy/decision-makers

Communities

Civic Tech

CONTACT CTIN

CASE STUDY

Dataphyte: Deploying data tools and technology for socio-economic development of Nigeria

TYPE OF ORGANISATION RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INITIATIVE

NAME

EMAIL

WEBSITE

Dataphyte

admin@dataphyte.com

STATUS

COUNTRY

FOUNDING DATE

Live

Nigeria

2020

N/A

BRIEF OVERVIEW OF CASE STUDY

Dataphyte is an independent, data analytics company producing data-driven analyses and development reports with the mission to drive reforms, good governance, and development in Nigeria. Dataphyte is the for-profit, research and development program of The Interactive Initiative for Social Impact.

WHAT WAS THE PROBLEM AND APPROACH?

The Problem

Policy, and development planning is currently based on outdated datasets and often extrapolated estimates. Dataphyte was born out of a need to fill the gap in data accessibility, especially in formats that support governance, policy analysis, and accountability work in Nigeria.

 

The Solution

Dataphyte collates and curates data from diverse sources and transforms these data into machine-readable formats, generates interactive visualisations, and publishes data-driven insights and analysis to fill the gaps. Essentially, the platform provides access to open data useful for journalists, researchers, and civil society analysts. Also, the platform produces compelling data-driven insights that explain trends, relations and present them as intelligent information that policymakers, civil society, and the general population can use to make informed decisions and demand accountability. 

Dataphyte also has innovative ways of breaking down statistical stories for readers and sparking conversations around policies, including “Numbers II Ponder,” a weekly newsletter that extracts and shares important figures from recent news; and data cards, which are straightforward infographics that share essential statistics on population, health, budget and more.

LESSONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

What played out and why? (story, enablers / obstacles, successes / challenges, assessment…)

Joshua Olufemi is the Founder and Publisher of Dataphyte. Joshua Olufemi is a media innovation and development entrepreneur who believes that the media can recreate itself as a viable and sustainable pillar of good governance and global development. 

Olufemi, who has over a decade of experience working in the media, accountability, and open data advocacy sector, resigned from his job as the program director at the Premium Times Centre for Investigative Journalism (PTCIJ) to work full-time on the project. He started contemplating the need for a standalone data journalism outfit in 2015, but it did not start taking shape until 2018 when he participated in a five-month fellowship organized by the National Endowment for Democracy (NED). Dataphyte finally launched the following year and began fully operating in January 2020. 

 

For Olufemi, the NED fellowship presented an opportunity to establish a model data journalism platform in Nigeria inspired by FiveThirtyEight, a U.S.-based establishment that tells compelling stories using statistical analysis. “There is no model that a Nigerian journalist can aspire to,” he said. “We don’t have [a group] who is really doing data journalism for data journalism’s sake. I wanted to fill that gap.” 

As an intervention to data accessibility and governance, Dataphyte was launched to provide the accountability and policy sectors with cleaner, analysed, easily accessible and useable data to drive democracy and development in Nigeria. 

 

What are some of the key lessons? 

Olufemi believes that reporters stand to learn a lot from Dataphyte’s model of data journalism. According to him, data not only allows you to grab the attention of an audience, but it also helps journalists filter through their biases so they can be more objective in their reporting.

“It helps to relate with an intolerant government that believes everything you say is either from the opposition, or because you are anti-progress,” Olufemi said. “Data became a fact-checking tool, but also a safe instrument for accountability. It helps you to present facts, even using government information.” 

RELATED LINKS & DOWNLOADS

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

Follow the Money: Tracking government spending and international aid for rural communities
KEY INDIVIDUAL(s)

Hamzat Lawal

WHO CAN BENEFIT FROM
THIS CASE STUDY

Governments

Policymakers

Women and Children

NGOs

KEY CATEGORIES

Citizen Engagement and Voice

Government

Access to information

Accountability

Transparency

CONTACT CTIN

CASE STUDY

Follow the Money: Advocate, visualize and tracking government spending and international aid for rural communities

TYPE OF ORGANISATION RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INITIATIVE

NAME

EMAIL

WEBSITE

STATUS

COUNTRY

FOUNDING DATE

Live

Nigeria

2014

N/A

BRIEF OVERVIEW OF CASE STUDY

Follow the Money is an anti-corruption civic tech website which uses campaigns driven by hashtags on social media to track community projects. Follow the Money has over 2,000+ members and this year expanded into Kenya and The Gambia. In 2018 it won the One Africa award which came with $100,000 to support their work. Follow the Money activists collect, publish, and visualize data, then connect findings to national and global social media networks in order to bring government attention to crises on the ground that require resources or immediate action. The team has tackled issues like lead poisoning, flood relief, and most recently, education.

WHAT WAS THE PROBLEM AND APPROACH?

The Problem

There is often negligent and lack of transparency from government officials particularly on issues affecting rural communities. Follow the Money was formed as a response to a lead poisoning in Bagega, Zamfara State in Nigeria. Follow the Money team witnessed how children in the community were suffering from specific symptoms, and in some cases had died from the lead poisoning. 

 

The Solution

Follow the Money activists collect, publish, and visualize data, then connect findings to national and global social media networks in order to bring government attention to crises on the ground that require resources or immediate action. Once visualized, the data become a resource for citizens in affected communities to track government expenditures against actual outcomes.

Follow the Money uses Ushahidi, a data management system, to collect, store, and transform the data collected (including via SMS) into tabular, structured data formats.  These data visualizations and findings are translated into local languages, and additional surveys and communications activities take place via offline communities via SMS. 

Follow the Money’s process can be summarized as follows;

  1. Data mining for donor-supported projects and budgetary provisions from procurement boards, tender documents, newspapers, and radio stations.
  2. Ground-truthing – visiting project sites to ascertain implementation status.
  3. Community engagement – facilitation of community outreach activities and town hall meetings where all interested parties: benefiting communities, officials of the government, contractors, community leadership, media, cleric, etc. will converge to discuss project implementation reports and sustainability.
  4. Offline advocacy – with outcomes from outreaches and town hall meetings, Follow the Money writes FOI letters to relevant agencies of the government, letters of complaints or satisfaction and also compiles the community scorecard or petition, where necessary.
  5. Online advocacy – the use of new media helps our team for amplification of core messages and mobilization of citizens for collective action.

Government feedback – the ultimate aim is to extract government’s responsiveness in the form of improvement in service delivery and resolution of conflicts. 

LESSONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

What played out and why? (story, enablers / obstacles, successes / challenges, assessment…)

Following the lead poising in Bagega, the Follow the Money team first documented the needs of the community through interviews, photos, videos, and surveys recorded via mobile devices. The team then used this information to identify and plan how the government could intervene. 

According to Hamzat Lawal Co-founder of Follow the Money, the group monitors announcements of grants and donations for low-income communities, and for transparency, they contact the government, agency, or individuals responsible for the grant to provide a breakdown of how they intend to spend the money.

“We also visit these communities to find out if they have received any funding or palliatives based on the information we get from the donors. We make sure we empower them with information we have on the donation so that they are able to demand accountability from the government or agency involved in the donation”.  

The Follow the Money team is composed of journalist, data wranglers, development consultants, information analyst, legal practitioners and others who are interested in how open data be used to for transparency and accountability.

What are some of the lessons? 

Following the Bagega lead poisoning, data visualizations helped policy makers quickly understand the circumstances and allowed for swift decision-making. In addition to that, the team developed a social media campaign using the hashtag #SaveBagega, which brought the crisis scenario front and centre government officials who were able to channel resources to Bagega.

To read on the work Follow the Money did during the COVID-19 pandemic, read here.

RELATED LINKS & DOWNLOADS

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

Nuru: Empowering citizens with crowdsource observations during the COVID-19 pandemic
KEY INDIVIDUAL(s)

John Mucheke

WHO CAN BENEFIT FROM
THIS CASE STUDY

Governments

Policymakers

Women and Children

NGOs

KEY CATEGORIES

Health

Crowdsourcing

Open Data

Public Services

Mobile

Access to information

CONTACT CTIN

CASE STUDY

Nuru: Empowering citizens with crowdsource observations during the COVID-19 pandemic

TYPE OF ORGANISATION RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INITIATIVE

NAME

EMAIL

WEBSITE

Nuru

nuru@openinstitute.com

STATUS

COUNTRY

FOUNDING DATE

Live

Kenya

2020

N/A

BRIEF OVERVIEW OF CASE STUDY

Nuru – Kiswahili for “Lighta tool that is designed to empower citizen community monitoring to crowdsource observations about how they are coping in the exceptionally difficult circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic. It is available as a mobile app available on Google Play and IOS App store and the reports that citizens make through it are readily available on their website.

Nuru is a tool in the citizen’s hands to provide governments and other stakeholders with the information they need to develop and offer solutions to the unique challenges faced by their citizens.

WHAT WAS THE PROBLEM AND APPROACH?

The Problem

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about a great socio-economic crisis, affecting citizens’ economic activities and access to key services. Various measures and restrictions undertaken by governments to control the spread of the disease have also affected citizens, bringing up security concerns, issues of increased domestic violence, food, and water scarcity among other issues.

 

The Solution

The Nuru platform is a channel through which citizens can share in real-time the challenges they are encountering within their communities. Through written reports, tagging, capturing live images, and sharing their location, this report can easily be visualised on a map, further inspiring the access to assistance, services, and other actions. By targeting the information using tags, the relevant “agent of change” is able to access the relevant information and help the communities and individuals. 

Reports could share information on these kind issues and more: 

  • The availability of water & sanitation 
  • The high cost of food and necessities 
  • Poverty and the in-availability of a basic income 
  • Random acts of kindness in communities 
  • Interesting local solutions that exist in communities 
  • Lack of adequate contextually actionable information

The platform uses a crowdsourcing approach, providing real-time information that can be analyzed and utilized to influence policy. The information from a wide range of communities will highlight what their specific needs and challenges are, especially with regard to critical and basic needs.

LESSONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

What played out and why? (story, enablers / obstacles, successes / challenges, assessment…)

In consultation with other players in the Civil Society and Government circles, the Nuru team was able to figure out the major issues that would be facing communities especially in low-income areas. This is the reason the platform uses a crowdsourcing approach, providing real-time information that can be analysed and utilized to influence policy. The information from various communities, highlights what their specific needs and challenges are, especially with regard to critical and basic needs. 

This crowdsourcing approach provides a way to bridge the information gap between citizens and governments, civil society organisations and other stakeholders.  By providing real-time information, timely interventions can be provided to aid the affected communities, leading to better outcomes for the countries and communities affected by this, and other future crises. 

“The main challenge that we have faced has been how to rapidly develop an iOS version of the Nuru.live Mobile App. We are also facing challenges getting a good UI/UX developer for a clean and functioning template for both the Mobile App and the Website”. 

Future plans and goals

  • We aim to improve our reporting module with interactive and engaging infographics. We will also be adding social media sharing options to enable users to share their reports directly to social media, or to share these directly from the app, the moment they are posted.
  • We aim to improve our notification service with more localized information for the users especially in relation to tags they might have shown interest in.
  • We aim to add translation options to the app and to the web portal.
  • We will engage in more user engagements and interviews to further refine our reporting reach and to better provide avenues through which the citizens can get any required assistance, and better help people possibly affected by COVID-19. 

 

What were the lessons?

Vulnerable communities lead to vulnerable countries in times of nationwide crises, bringing truth to the saying “you are only as strong as your weakest link.” Nuru helps communities exercise their voice so that no one is left behind in finding solutions and everyone is involved in fighting the spread of COVID-19. 

RELATED LINKS & DOWNLOADS

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

A21 Campaign: Abolishing slavery everywhere, forever
KEY INDIVIDUAL(s)

Katie Modrau

WHO CAN BENEFIT FROM
THIS CASE STUDY

Governments

Policymakers

Women and Children

NGOs

KEY CATEGORIES

Human trafficking

Modern slavery

Safety

CONTACT CTIN

CASE STUDY

A21 Campaign: Abolishing slavery everywhere, forever

TYPE OF ORGANISATION RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INITIATIVE

NAME

EMAIL

WEBSITE

A21

N/A

A21

STATUS

COUNTRY

FOUNDING DATE

Live

South Africa

N/A

N/A

BRIEF OVERVIEW OF CASE STUDY

The A21 Campaign (commonly referred to as “A21”) is a global non-profit, non-governmental organisation that works to fight human trafficking, including sexual exploitation, forced slave labour, bonded labour, involuntary domestic servitude, and child soldiery. The A21 aims to “abolish slavery everywhere, forever. The A21 Campaign has branches in Australia, Cambodia, Denmark, Bulgaria, Greece, Norway, Portugal, South Africa, Spain, Thailand, Ukraine, United Kingdom and the United States.

QUICK FACTS/TAKEAWAYS FROM THE CASE STUDY

There are more people enslaved today than any other time in history

  • The human trafficking industry is a $150 billion
 dollar industry
  • There is about 40.3 million people are enslaved around the world, 5.4 out of every 1,000 people are enslaved 
in the world
  • Of the 40.3 million about are 71% women, 29% men, 25% are children
  • Slavery happens in
 every country
WHAT WAS THE PROBLEM AND APPROACH?

The problem?

  • Through force, fraud, and coercion, people everywhere are being bought and sold against their will.

What was the approach taken to it?

  • In 2008, Caine and her husband founded the A21 Campaign. This was after she saw handmade posters with pictures of missing girls in Greece. Amazed by the number of children Caine did some further research and found out that these children were trafficked.
LESSONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

A21 campaign collaborates with various people who want to join the movement against trafficking, A21 Campaign provides tools and suggestions for action. Ways to combat trafficking include buying fair trade products, volunteering, lobbying politicians and organising fundraisers and awareness groups. A21 Campaign also makes a difference by helping recovered trafficking victims.

RELATED LINKS & DOWNLOADS

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.

NOTE: The case studies submitted will be used in content creation, we will write articles on your work that engages with our readers. The case studies will also be compiled and added to our CTIN database of civic tech case studies and shared through our various channels.